Integrating Infusion Pumps - Planning
Integrating Infusion Pumps - Planning
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Type: Past Webinar Presentations
Price: $130.00
 
Product Information:

This is a 104Mb zipped file containing presentation file and recording of the actual webinar. Originally aired and recorded on April 11, 2014.

CMBES Members: Discounted price is $100 (available when you log in to your CMBES account)
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Presenters:

Erin Sparnon, Ecri Institute

Jennifer Jackson, Cedars-Sinai Hospital, LA

Overview:  The effectiveness of Rapid Response Systems (RRS) is dependent on early detection of the deteriorating patient. This is especially challenging in non-ICU setting were nurse to patient ratios are often 1:5 or greater.  Leaders in RRS agree continuous vital signs monitoring strengthens the afferent limb of rapid response, but only if nuisance alarms are addressed.  Early detection for general ward patients requires continuous monitoring of all vital signs (HR, Resp, BP, SpO2, Temp) that allows the patients to freely ambulate. A new generation of wireless, digital on-body devices are emerging that addresses this need.  This presentation will review the requirements for early detection of the deteriorating patient, an innovative on-body technology that addresses this need, and an evidence based approach to alarm management for this patient populationThe effectiveness of Rapid Response Systems (RRS) is dependent on early detection of the deteriorating patient. This is especially challenging in non-ICU setting were nurse to patient ratios are often 1:5 or greater.  Leaders in RRS agree continuous vital signs monitoring strengthens the afferent limb of rapid response, but only if nuisance alarms are addressed.  Early detection for general ward patients requires continuous monitoring of all vital signs (HR, Resp, BP, SpO2, Temp) that allows the patients to freely ambulate. A new generation of wireless, digital on-body devices are emerging that addresses this need.  This presentation will review the requirements for early detection of the deteriorating patient, an innovative on-body technology that addresses this need, and an evidence based approach to alarm management for this patient populationThe effectiveness of Rapid Response Systems (RRS) is dependent on early detection of the deteriorating patient. This is especially challenging in non-ICU setting were nurse to patient ratios are often 1:5 or greater.  Leaders in RRS agree continuous vital signs monitoring strengthens the afferent limb of rapid response, but only if nuisance alarms are addressed.  Early detection for general ward patients requires continuous monitoring of all vital signs (HR, Resp, BP, SpO2, Temp) that allows the patients to freely ambulate. A new generation of wireless, digital on-body devices are emerging that addresses this need.  This presentation will review the requirements for early detection of the deteriorating patient, an innovative on-body technology that addresses this need, and an evidence based approach to alarm management for this patient populationThe effectiveness of Rapid Response Systems (RRS) is dependent on early detection of the deteriorating patient. This is especially challenging in non-ICU setting were nurse to patient ratios are often 1:5 or greater.  Leaders in RRS agree continuous vital signs monitoring strengthens the afferent limb of rapid response, but only if nuisance alarms are addressed.  Early detection for general ward patients requires continuous monitoring of all vital signs (HR, Resp, BP, SpO2, Temp) that allows the patients to freely ambulate. A new generation of wireless, digital on-body devices are emerging that addresses this need.  This presentation will review the requirements for early detection of the deteriorating patient, an innovative on-body technology that addresses this need, and an evidence based approach to alarm management for this patient populationThe effectiveness of Rapid Response Systems (RRS) is dependent on early detection of the deteriorating patient. This is especially challenging in non-ICU setting were nurse to patient ratios are often 1:5 or greater.  Leaders in RRS agree continuous vital signs monitoring strengthens the afferent limb of rapid response, but only if nuisance alarms are addressed.  Early detection for general ward patients requires continuous monitoring of all vital signs (HR, Resp, BP, SpO2, Temp) that allows the patients to freely ambulate. A new generation of wireless, digital on-body devices are emerging that addresses this need.  This presentation will review the requirements for early detection of the deteriorating patient, an innovative on-body technology that addresses this need, and an evidence based approach to alarm management for this patient population

Detailed overview of infusion pump integration goals and definitions, five infrastructure elements needed before starting integration projects, advice on purchasing and RFP negotiation, and best practices from early adopters. Actual steps taken at Cedars Sinai leading to go-live integration in 2014 including details of implementation.

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