Integrating Infusion Pumps - Fully Integrated at
Integrating Infusion Pumps -  Fully Integrated at
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Type: Past Webinar Presentations
Price: $130.00
 
Product Information:

This is a 101Mb zipped file containing presentation file and recording of the actual webinar. Originally aired and recorded on April 25, 2014.

CMBES Members: Discounted price is $100 (available when you log in to your CMBES account)
Actual Registrants of the this webinar: Free for a year after the original event. (Must log in to your CMBES account and then go to STORE)

 

Presenters:

 

Sarah Giga, Clinical Application Integration Manager, Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota

Bobbie Carroll, Director of Nursing Informatics and Patient Safety, Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota

Overview:  The effectiveness of Rapid Response Systems (RRS) is dependent on early detection of the deteriorating patient. This is especially challenging in non-ICU setting were nurse to patient ratios are often 1:5 or greater.  Leaders in RRS agree continuous vital signs monitoring strengthens the afferent limb of rapid response, but only if nuisance alarms are addressed.  Early detection for general ward patients requires continuous monitoring of all vital signs (HR, Resp, BP, SpO2, Temp) that allows the patients to freely ambulate. A new generation of wireless, digital on-body devices are emerging that addresses this need.  This presentation will review the requirements for early detection of the deteriorating patient, an innovative on-body technology that addresses this need, and an evidence based approach to alarm management for this patient populationThe effectiveness of Rapid Response Systems (RRS) is dependent on early detection of the deteriorating patient. This is especially challenging in non-ICU setting were nurse to patient ratios are often 1:5 or greater.  Leaders in RRS agree continuous vital signs monitoring strengthens the afferent limb of rapid response, but only if nuisance alarms are addressed.  Early detection for general ward patients requires continuous monitoring of all vital signs (HR, Resp, BP, SpO2, Temp) that allows the patients to freely ambulate. A new generation of wireless, digital on-body devices are emerging that addresses this need.  This presentation will review the requirements for early detection of the deteriorating patient, an innovative on-body technology that addresses this need, and an evidence based approach to alarm management for this patient populationThe effectiveness of Rapid Response Systems (RRS) is dependent on early detection of the deteriorating patient. This is especially challenging in non-ICU setting were nurse to patient ratios are often 1:5 or greater.  Leaders in RRS agree continuous vital signs monitoring strengthens the afferent limb of rapid response, but only if nuisance alarms are addressed.  Early detection for general ward patients requires continuous monitoring of all vital signs (HR, Resp, BP, SpO2, Temp) that allows the patients to freely ambulate. A new generation of wireless, digital on-body devices are emerging that addresses this need.  This presentation will review the requirements for early detection of the deteriorating patient, an innovative on-body technology that addresses this need, and an evidence based approach to alarm management for this patient populationThe effectiveness of Rapid Response Systems (RRS) is dependent on early detection of the deteriorating patient. This is especially challenging in non-ICU setting were nurse to patient ratios are often 1:5 or greater.  Leaders in RRS agree continuous vital signs monitoring strengthens the afferent limb of rapid response, but only if nuisance alarms are addressed.  Early detection for general ward patients requires continuous monitoring of all vital signs (HR, Resp, BP, SpO2, Temp) that allows the patients to freely ambulate. A new generation of wireless, digital on-body devices are emerging that addresses this need.  This presentation will review the requirements for early detection of the deteriorating patient, an innovative on-body technology that addresses this need, and an evidence based approach to alarm management for this patient populationThe effectiveness of Rapid Response Systems (RRS) is dependent on early detection of the deteriorating patient. This is especially challenging in non-ICU setting were nurse to patient ratios are often 1:5 or greater.  Leaders in RRS agree continuous vital signs monitoring strengthens the afferent limb of rapid response, but only if nuisance alarms are addressed.  Early detection for general ward patients requires continuous monitoring of all vital signs (HR, Resp, BP, SpO2, Temp) that allows the patients to freely ambulate. A new generation of wireless, digital on-body devices are emerging that addresses this need.  This presentation will review the requirements for early detection of the deteriorating patient, an innovative on-body technology that addresses this need, and an evidence based approach to alarm management for this patient population

Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota is one of the small group of organizations that have fully integrated infusion pumps with orders, verification, autoprogramming, and documentation. Successes like this contribute directly to efforts of other organizations that will follow the same path. This perspective will reveal what integration looks like several months after implementation. Presenters from Minnesota Children’s Hospital will key-in on areas such as lessons learned, what works well, challenges, and resources required to maintain the new paradigm. They wil discuss the clinical impact and how data is used to improve processes.

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